Your Leg and Arm Pain Could Indicate a More Severe Heart-Related Illness

Your Leg and Arm Pain Could Indicate a More Severe Heart-Related Illness

If you experience pain in your legs or arms while exercising, your discomfort might not be the result of too many reps or muscle strain from trying to set a new personal record. Rather, your pain may be indicative of a condition affecting the blood vessels, known as claudication. Claudication, sometimes referred to as intermittent claudication, occurs when blood flow to the legs (or arms) is restricted. Most patients first notice the pain associated with claudication during routine exercise, but it can also be made apparent during periods of rest if left untreated.

Surprisingly, claudication isn’t technically a disease. It’s actually a symptom of a disease — peripheral artery disease. Although treatable, peripheral artery disease is a potentially serious condition that restricts the ability of your blood vessels to circulate blood. This limits the amount of blood flowing to your legs and arms, which creates complications for those hoping to maintain an active and pain-free lifestyle. In this article, we’ll detail everything you need to know about claudication, including its symptoms and causes. If you believe that the pain in your legs and arms can be attributed to claudication, consult a cardiologist in Tampa from Ascent Cardiology Group to discuss your treatment options.

Symptoms

The symptoms of claudication are mainly pain-related, so it’s essential that you pay attention to what your body is telling you and avoid excessive strain. When your body says enough is enough, take a break and allow yourself to recover. The most common symptom of claudication is pain during exercise, which can occur in your feet, calves, thighs, hips, buttocks, or, less commonly, arms. Claudication will lead to pain in whichever area of your body is experiencing narrowing arteries or arterial damage. 

But what about people who don’t exercise or live a largely sedentary lifestyle? For these people, intermittent pain may still be felt during less-strenuous activities like shopping or gardening. The longer claudication goes untreated, the more apparent the pain will become. For instance, individuals may feel pain in their legs or back while sitting or lying down in the later stages of claudication. Discolored skin or ulcerations can also occur in those with severely restricted blood flow, leading to sores on the legs, feet, toes, arms, or fingers. If you notice that your toes or fingers have taken on a bluish hue or feel cold or clammy, you should consult a cardiologist in Tampa.

Causes

As we mentioned above, claudication is most often a symptom of peripheral artery disease, a disease that causes atherosclerosis in the arms or legs. Narrowed arteries cannot facilitate the flow of blood throughout the body and only get worse over time as fat, cholesterol, and other atherosclerotic plaques further clog the arteries. The body’s complex circulation system is like a series of highways designed to eliminate “traffic,” or congestive elements that restrict blood flow. Atherosclerosis is like a traffic jam. Too much atherosclerosis and the whole system starts to drag, resulting in less oxygenated blood in the places you need it most. 

Atherosclerosis and, by extension, peripheral artery disease, are the main causes of claudication, but there are other potential causes, too. Spinal stenosis, peripheral neuropathy and, certain musculoskeletal conditions can also lead to claudication. There are many factors that can increase your risk of developing atherosclerosis and, therefore, claudication, including:

  • Age: 50+ (Smokers and Diabetics)
  • Age: 70+
  • Diabetes
  • Family History
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Obesity (BMI > 30)
  • Smoking

If you are experiencing pain in your arms or legs, you may be suffering from a type of pain known as claudication. Consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, to learn more about diagnosis and treatment. In the meantime, you can take some simple steps to control your condition, such as:

  • Eat Healthy (Reduce Saturated Fat)
  • Quit Smoking
  • Reduce Your Cholesterol and Blood Pressure Levels
  • Regulate Your Body Weight

To consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

 

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology Group website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology Group or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology Group. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology Group is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

What Your Family History Says About Your Heart Health

Heart disease remains the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. While smoking, stress, and diet are clear risk factors, family history must also be taken into account when determining if a person is at an increased risk of developing this deadly condition. 

Below, we discuss how family history — your genes and upbringing —  is a key indicator in determining your risk of developing heart disease. If your parents, siblings, or close relatives have been afflicted with heart disease, consider seeking a heart specialist in Tampa Bay who can diagnose your condition.

It Runs in the Family 

When looking at your family history, start with your immediate family and work your way back. Did your parents or siblings suffer from a heart attack or stroke at a young age (55 or younger for men, 65 or younger for women)? Even if your parents were spared, if a grandparent suffered from heart disease, it could indicate that you are at an increased risk of developing heart disease. In addition to heart attack and stroke, consider scheduling an appointment with a cardiologist if any of the following heart diseases are present in your family history: 

  • Congenital Heart Disease
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Heart Failure
  • Heart Valve Disease
  • Abnormal Heart Rhythms

Inherited risk factors like diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol can also lead to heart disease and may shed light on who in your family is susceptible to developing a heart-related problem. For assistance in diagnosing and treating these conditions, consult a Tampa heart specialist from Ascent Cardiology Group. 

Looking at Environmental Factors 

Remember, family history is a combination of your genes and upbringing. The environment your family shares has an impact on your risk of developing heart disease. For example, if you come from a low-income family that was unable to afford healthy food, this may lead to heart disease later in life.

There are, of course, other characteristics that are beyond your control, such as your age, sex, and race or ethnicity. All of these risk factors can stack up and make it seem like heart disease is inevitable, but the only way to know for sure is to contact a Tampa heart specialist who can set your mind at ease and determine what treatment, if any, is right for you.  

Consult a Cardiologist

At Ascent Cardiology Group, we can employ several noninvasive procedures, such as a stress test or transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), to make a diagnosis and determine once and for all if you are at risk or suffering from heart disease. These same-day procedures allow our cardiologists to immediately diagnose the conditions of the heart. From there, we can develop a treatment plan and take any necessary steps to ensure your heart health is preserved. If you are concerned that your family history puts you at risk of developing heart disease, take a precautionary step and schedule an appointment with Sachin Diwadkar, M.D., of Ascent Cardiology Group. 

To consult a heart specialist in Tampa Bay from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology Group website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology Group or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology Group. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology Group is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

Staying Active With Heart Disease

Living with heart disease may require you to make some alterations to your lifestyle, but you can still enjoy being active, so long as you understand how to manage your condition. In fact, exercise is an important component of mitigating the effects of heart disease. Regular physical activity can help you strengthen your heart and keep your blood pressure and cholesterol levels at bay. If you are suffering from heart disease, consult a cardiologist in Tampa from Ascent Cardiology Group to see how your exercise regimen can be tailored to your condition.

Your Heart Needs Exercise

Exercise plays an important role in your heart health. From a young age, we are taught that exercise is a vital component of our growth from adolescence to adulthood. This logic doesn’t change as you get older. In fact, the importance of exercise is reinforced as time passes, especially when your heart starts to exhibit symptoms of heart disease. 

When your heart is strong, there’s a reduced chance of you succumbing to chest pain and other symptoms during exercise, which helps you sustain longer periods of increased activity. Other benefits to exercise include reduced blood pressure and cholesterol, weight loss, and strong bones. Those suffering from diabetes can control their blood sugar more effectively by exercising. 

Consult a Cardiologist Before You Kick-Off a New Workout Program

Before you start taking on a new exercise regimen, consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL. By doing so, you can make sure that you’re staying healthy while staying active. In particular, individuals that have recently undergone a heart procedure or surgery or experienced a heart attack, chest pain or pressure, or shortness of breath should approach exercise deliberately to avoid putting excessive strain on their heart.

When you consult a cardiologist in Tampa from Ascent Cardiology Group, an experienced medical professional can tell you which exercises are best for your overall health and provide tips for easing back into an active lifestyle. Some potential recommendations may include:

  • Focus on aerobic activities. Your heart and lungs benefit most from exercises that push them to use oxygen. Aerobic activities also improve blood circulation. Try to increase the intensity of these exercises moderately every session.
  • Start slowly. Walking, swimming, light jogging, and biking are all examples of exercises that you can perform without worrying about overdoing it. 
  • Stretch before you start exercising to prevent other injuries. If you pull a muscle in your leg, you might not be able to run comfortably. If you can’t perform the exercise, your heart won’t benefit.
  • If you start to get tired or feel you are experiencing heart symptoms, take a break and cool down. 
  • Wear the proper clothing and footwear during exercise.
  • Pay attention to the weather. If it’s hot, exercise in the morning or in the evening. If it’s cold or snowy, exercise inside. Working out in freezing temperatures is ill-advised for those with heart disease.
  • Supplement your aerobic exercises with resistance weight training, which helps you improve your strength and muscular elasticity.

Live Your Life

Don’t let heart disease stop you from enjoying the things you most love to do. Whether you’re an avid fishermen, skilled gardener, or former marathon winner, you deserve to take part in the activities that make you happy. At Ascent Cardiology Group, we help patients overcome their heart-related ailments by guiding them through a comprehensive treatment program that uses the latest diagnostic procedures and noninvasive treatments to improve patient comfort and minimize side effects.

To consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

How Diabetes Leads to Heart Disease

Over 30 million Americans suffered from diabetes in 2015. Of those 30 million, roughly seven million went undiagnosed. This is especially alarming considering the connection between diabetes and heart disease. Below, we explore this connection and offer suggestions for those looking to control their blood glucose levels and prevent dangerous health conditions. If you suffer from diabetes or suspect that you do, it’s imperative that you take the initiative to better your heart health by consulting the best interventional cardiologist in Tampa, Dr. Sachin Diwadkar, FACC, FASE, of Ascent Cardiology Group.  

The Results of High Blood Glucose Levels  

Simply put, diabetes occurs when your blood has high blood glucose levels — too much sugar. If left untreated, high blood glucose will damage blood vessels and nerves, leading to heart disease. Your chances of developing heart disease only grow so long as you have diabetes. For those with diabetes or pre-diabetes, heart disease can take the form of the following:

  • Coronary Heart Disease
  • Heart Failure
  • Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

In addition to heart disease, diabetes can lead to heart failure, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. While it may seem like nothing more than a preventable inconvenience, diabetes is a serious condition that can lead to life-threatening complications if not kept in check. 

Causes of Diabetes 

Whether type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it can be difficult to pinpoint the exact cause. It’s a common misconception that poor diet alone causes diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is believed to be caused by genetics and environmental factors. While there is a strong connection between obesity and type 2 diabetes, genetic and environmental factors are also connected and the ultimate cause remains alone. 

If you are suffering or believe you are suffering from diabetes, there’s nothing for you to be ashamed of. Diabetes is a common disease that afflicts millions of Americans. More importantly, it’s a preventable and treatable condition. 

Symptoms of Diabetes

The symptoms for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes include exhaustion, hunger, frequent urination, increased thirst, dry mouth and skin, and blurred vision. However, you may also experience yeast infections, difficulty healing from cuts and sores, and nerve damage resulting in pain or numbness in your feet if you’ve had type 2 diabetes for some time.

If your diabetes has lead to heart disease, you may experience severe symptoms or no symptoms at all. Those that silently suffer from heart disease do so at the risk of suffering a larger complication later in life, such as a heart attack. 

Prevention and Treatment Options  

Those that are worried about diabetes and their heart health can begin to make lifestyle changes to lower their chances of developing heart disease. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) recommends that you eat well, stop smoking, be active, take prescribed medications as directed to by a doctor, and reduce stress. These are excellent recommendations; however, if your diabetes has progressed to a more serious condition, it’s imperative that you consult a cardiologist. 

At Ascent Cardiology Group, we specialize in interventional cardiology in Tampa. With the use of advanced, minimally invasive techniques, such as radial artery catheterization, we can diagnose and effectively treat your condition. Put your health first by trusting a doctor that has dedicated his life to improving the lives of patients who struggle with heart disease. Trust Dr. Diwadkar and the team of cardiologists at Ascent Cardiology Group. 

To consult the best interventional cardiologist in Tampa, from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

What a Stress Test Can Say About Your Heart Health

An exercise stress test shows how hard your heart is working during physical activity. By making your heart work harder, this test can reveal abnormalities that may be vital for the detection and prevention of heart disease. Below, we will discuss the importance of stress tests and how they are administered by Dr. Sachin Diwadkar, FACC, FASE, and the team of cardiologists at Ascent Cardiology Group. If you are concerned with your heart health and wish to undergo a stress test, consult a specialist in interventional cardiology in Tampa from Ascent Cardiology Group. 

What Happens During a Stress Test? 

A stress test consists of attaching a heart monitor to a patient and having them walk on a treadmill. As the test progresses, the treadmill will incline and gain speed, similar to walking up a hill. The test continues until a target heart rate is reached. In addition to asking you how you feel during the test, a cardiologist will record your heart rate, breathing, blood pressure, and electrical activity of the heart. At Ascent Cardiology Group, we take this test one step further by also employing transthoracic echocardiography for quick and painless visualization of the heart. Using ultrasounds, this method allows us to immediately diagnose cardiac abnormalities that would otherwise go undetected. 

Is a Stress Test Safe? 

A stress test is relatively risk-free and only as dangerous as a bike ride or walk up a hill would be. Medical professionals are always on hand to ensure that patient safety is a priority and to stop the test if at any point you feel uncomfortable. Preparation for this test is also relatively simple. A cardiologist will ask that you wear comfortable clothing and shoes. They may ask that you forgo eating, drinking, smoking, or taking certain medicines before the test. 

What Will a Stress Test Reveal? 

Despite the simplicity of a stress test, it can provide your cardiologist with a wealth of information regarding your heart health. A stress test can be used to diagnose coronary artery disease or the underlying cause of chest pain, shortness of breath, or lightheadedness. It can even be used to discern a patient’s risk of a heart attack. Additionally, a stress test says how much exercise your heart can handle, an important piece of knowledge to have for creating an exercise regimen to manage the effects of heart disease. What can a stress test say about your heart health? Quite a bit.

Have an Interventional Cardiologist Administer Your Stress Test 

What a stress test says about your heart health is important because a central component of interventional cardiology is using preventative measures and minimally invasive techniques to treat heart disease. If your cardiologist can determine how much your heart can handle, they can determine how best to proceed with medical treatment. If the results of your stress test are of concern, your cardiologist may recommend cardiac catheterization, an advanced procedure to diagnose and treat conditions of the heart. 

When in search of the best interventional cardiologist in Tampa, turn to a cardiologist who can not only administer your stress test but who also possesses the medical knowledge and expertise to develop the appropriate treatment plan following your test. Dr. Diwadkar is certified to perform all forms of echocardiography and stress testing. 

To consult the best interventional cardiologist in Tampa, from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology Group website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology Group or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology Group. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology Group is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

Tips for Keeping Your Child’s Heart Healthy

Do you remember the first time you heard your child’s heartbeat? Most people hear it for the first time after twelve weeks of pregnancy. At this point, the doctor may use a handheld Doppler machine to detect your child’s heartbeat. There’s nothing quite like this experience. The cadence of a fetus’ heartbeat is soft, nearly akin to a murmur, but nonetheless powerful and life-affirming. It’s truly a moment to cherish, but it also indicates the first stage of a lifelong dedication to your child’s heart health.

In this article, a cardiologist in Tampa from Ascent Cardiology Group will discuss some important tips for parents that want to keep their child’s heart healthy. If you or your child are suffering from a heart-related condition, or even if your family history suggests that a heart problem could materialize later on, consult a cardiologist in Tampa to learn more about treatment and prevention.

Encourage Exercise

Although the popularity of video games is at an all-time high, physical activity is still an essential component of your child’s overall well-being, and you can’t afford to let them turn into a couch potato under your vigil. Exercise helps strengthen the various parts of the heart and can help children avoid heart-related conditions related to inactivity and a sedentary lifestyle. The more you encourage your child to get out and play, the sooner they’ll see that a couple games of Fortnite can’t compare to outdoor activities like soccer, hide and seek, or going on a bike ride with friends.

Support Nutrition

Your house, your rules, right? In your kitchen, you get to set the dinner menu on a nightly basis. This means you control what your kids eat. You can’t blame a kid for eating fried chicken, hamburgers, and pizza if that’s all you give them. Support nutrition and nutrition will support your child’s heart health. It will also help them maintain a healthy weight, stay energized, and develop superior eating habits that can lead to years of sustained heart health. When your kids fight back against broccoli and carrots, search for new, heart-healthy recipes online that are designed to give kids the flavors they crave and the health benefits they need.

Consult a Cardiologist in Tampa

Regular medical checkups are integral to your child’s ongoing heart health. Those stethoscope tests aren’t just a formality, they’re an important part of a comprehensive plan to keep your child’s overall health in check. When your pediatrician or family doctor discovers an abnormality indicating a potential heart-related illness, call upon a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, to guide you through the steps that must be taken to ensure your child’s heart receives the appropriate care and treatment.

To consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology Group website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology Group or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

How Dangerous is Atrial Fibrillation?

Atrial fibrillation is a condition in which an individual experiences an irregular and sometimes rapid heartbeat. While atrial fibrillation is a relatively common and treatable condition, it can lead to life-threatening consequences if left unchecked. Symptoms include palpitations, weakness, lethargy, dizziness, lightheadedness, shortness of breath, and chest pain. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms or are concerned with your overall heart health, consult a cardiologist in Tampa from Ascent Cardiology Group. 

Life-Threatening Complications

The main concern with atrial fibrillation is that it increases the risk of stroke and heart failure. An irregular heartbeat can cause blood clots to form in the heart’s upper chambers. Subsequently, a stroke can occur when one of these blood clots travels from the heart to the brain. This is concerning because of the distinct correlation between atrial fibrillation and strokes; atrial fibrillation is present in one out of every five strokes.  

Even if a stroke is avoided, atrial fibrillation can weaken the heart to the point that it is unable to pump enough blood throughout the body. This is known as heart failure, a lifelong condition that can cause severe health problems and lead to death. Due to the potentially lifelong implications of atrial fibrillation, it’s imperative that anyone who is experiencing an irregular heartbeat seek diagnosis and treatment from a qualified cardiologist in Tampa, FL

Risk Factors

Palpitations, chest pain, and fatigue are common symptoms of atrial fibrillation. However, many sufferers experience no symptoms until they are examined by a medical professional. If the following risk factors apply to you, you should schedule an appointment to not only prevent atrial fibrillation but also promote your general heart health: 

  • Advanced Age
  • Heart Disease
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Kidney or Lung Disease
  • Thyroid Issues 
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Alcoholism
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes 
  • Family History

Treating Atrial Fibrillation

Medication and lifestyle changes are often all that is needed to treat atrial fibrillation and restore proper heart functions. Those who live with atrial fibrillation can go on to enjoy a happy, healthy life without being severely impacted by their condition. In more severe cases, catheter ablation, a minimally invasive procedure, can be employed to create scar tissue that disrupts the abnormal electrical signals that are causing the patient’s heart to beat irregularly.

The Plan That’s Right for You

Your current symptoms may not be dangerous, but they can lead to a lifelong and life-threatening condition. Don’t allow this treatable condition to take control of your life; book an appointment with an experienced cardiologist in Tampa and take the first steps towards reclaiming your heart health. 

At Ascent Cardiology Group, we specialize in interventional cardiology, an innovative branch of cardiology that is focused on non-surgical methods to diagnose and treat heart conditions. Accordingly, our treatment plans are personalized and depend entirely on patient needs. When looking for the treatment plan that’s right for you, place your trust in Dr. Sachin Diwadkar and the team of professionals at Ascent Cardiology Group. 

To consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology Group website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology Group or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology Group. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology Group is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

Diseases of the Mitral Valve

The mitral valve is one of the four valves found in the human heart. It is located between the left atrium and the left ventricle. Like all heart valves, the mitral valve helps regulate the flow of blood through the heart; specifically, from the left atrium to the left ventricle. Whenever the heart contracts, the mitral valve seals itself off to stop blood from flowing into the lungs. A diseased or damaged mitral valve cannot function and should be surgically repaired or replaced by a cardiologist in Tampa

Those suffering from a condition involving the mitral valve can get progressively worse over time if left untreated. Mitral valve diseases, such as mitral valve regurgitation and mitral valve stenosis, can be debilitating on their own, but they also open the door for other conditions, such as heart dilation and atrial fibrillation. If you are experiencing symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, fatigue, swollen ankles or legs, persistent coughing, or heart palpitations, consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, from Ascent Cardiology Group to see if you are suffering from one of the diseases of the mitral valve.

Mitral Valve Prolapse and Regurgitation

If the leaflets of the mitral valve bulge, or prolapse, it can cause issues during heart contractions, such as mitral valve regurgitation. Mitral valve regurgitation occurs when a prolapsed mitral valve allows blood to leak into the atrium from the ventricle. Although mitral valve prolapse isn’t especially harmful, and most people don’t realize that they have it, in some cases, treatment is required. This condition is most commonly caused by myxomatous valve disease, which is when the valve leaflets are too stretchy. 

Approximately two percent of the population suffers from mitral valve prolapse. Generally, this disease is passed down through genetics, but it can also be caused by health problems, like connective tissue diseases. Detecting mitral valve prolapse without the assistance of a cardiologist in Tampa can be difficult. Your cardiologist can listen to your heartbeat with a stethoscope to detect a murmur that may be indicative of mitral valve prolapse. Other symptoms include heart palpitations, chest pain, and fatigue.

Mitral Valve Stenosis

Unlike mitral valve prolapse, which occurs when the valve leaflets of the mitral valve are too stretchy, mitral valve stenosis occurs when these leaflets become too thick or stiff. When this happens, the leaflets can fuse together, resulting in a narrowed valve opening that constricts blood flow from the left atrium to the left ventricle, causing fatigue, shortness of breath, swelling, and more. Individuals suffering from this condition must consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, to determine whether the condition has progressed to the point where surgery will be required. If your condition becomes worse, your cardiologist can repair or replace the mitral valve utilizing a minimally invasive surgical option.

To consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology Group website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology Group or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology Group. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology Group is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

The Differences Between Invasive and Interventional Cardiology

For those suffering from coronary artery disease, heart valve disease, or peripheral vascular disease, your best chance for survival is to arm yourself with information on the treatment options available to you. Treatment for these diseases usually consists of tobacco cessation, exercise, dieting, and medications. However, these measures may not be enough to counteract symptoms, leaving surgery as the only remaining option. 

In this brief article, we will be discussing the key differences between invasive cardiology and interventional cardiology — two approaches that can have drastically different outcomes for patients. Consult with the best interventional cardiologist in Tampa, Dr. Sachin V. Diwadkar, FACC, FASE, of Ascent Cardiology Group, for any questions regarding your heart health. 

Invasive Cardiology 

Just as the name implies, invasive cardiology consists of using invasive measures to gain access to and diagnose problems in the heart. Angioplasty and stenting are common invasive procedures performed by way of a femoral arterial catheterization. Angioplasty consists of attaching a small balloon to a catheter and guiding it through the femoral artery. This balloon then inflates, pushing plaque against the walls of a clogged vein. Once the vein is open, a stent is placed to deliver medicine to the site and permanently hold the vein open. 

The problem with invasive cardiology is that femoral access is gained through the groin area. Complications associated with femoral access through the groin include increased discomfort and long recovery times. While rare, pseudoaneurysm, acute limb ischemia, and retroperitoneal bleeding can also occur. 

Interventional Cardiology 

Like invasive cardiology, interventional cardiology uses a catheter to treat heart disease. However, interventional cardiology is performed by way of a transradial catheterization. Due to a decrease in bleeding complications, discomfort, and recovery time, the radial artery is a superior location to gain access to the heart. Patients that undergo transradial catheterization can be up and walking around immediately following the procedure. The same thing cannot be said for those that undergo an invasive cardiology procedure. 

A Difference in Experience

At Ascent Cardiology Group, our goal to provide our patients with a quality of life that may have been unattainable prior to them coming through our doors. We accomplish this goal by combining the latest in minimally invasive techniques with unparalleled training. 

Upon completing his residency and fellowship in Cardiovascular Diseases, Dr. Diwadkar completed an additional fellowship in Interventional Cardiology at Tampa General Hospital and University of South Florida-affiliated institutes. When looking for interventional cardiology in Tampa, turn to Dr. Diwadkar and the team of cardiologists at Ascent Cardiology Group. 

To consult with Dr. Diwadkar, the best interventional cardiologist in Tampa, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for general educational purposes only. All content and media on the Ascent Cardiology Group website does not constitute professional medical advice nor is the information intended to replace the services of Ascent Cardiology Group or other qualified medical professionals. If you believe you are having a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.

The content, views, and opinions communicated on this website do not represent the views of Ascent Cardiology Group. Reliance on any information provided by this website is solely at your own risk. Although this website contains links to other medical websites, this is strictly for informational purposes. Ascent Cardiology Group is not responsible nor do they approve of the content featured on any third party linked websites referenced on this website.

What is Athlete’s Heart?

When you think about the heart of an athlete, you probably envision a person who has achieved peak physical health after years and years of exhaustive training, someone like Lebron James, Tom Brady, or Roger Federer, athletes who have spent years perfecting their cardiovascular endurance to perform at the highest level. On the contrary, athlete’s heart, otherwise known as athletic heart syndrome, is a condition stemming from changes in the heart that occur as the result of intense athletic training. In this article, a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, from Ascent Cardiology Group will explore everything athletes past, present, and future should know about athlete’s heart. 

Excessive Exercise Leads to Athlete’s Heart

The heart of an athlete must contend with up to twenty times the doctor-recommended weekly minimum of moderate intensity exercise (~150 minutes). Whether you’re a professional athlete or a hobbyist, excessive exercise can lead to unique electrical, structural, and functional changes in the heart. While many of these physiological adaptations aren’t life-threatening, it’s important to understand how they can affect your overall well-being. Fortunately, a cardiologist in Tampa can help you diagnose this subtle condition and provide you with any information necessary to help you deal with athlete’s heart.

Changes in Your Heart

Athletes may experience cardiovascular and peripheral adaptation when engaging in intense exercise. Some of these changes include:

  • Structural Changes: 10-25 percent increase in left ventricular wall thickness; 15 percent increase in bi-atrial dilatation in the left and right ventricle.
  • Electrical Changes: sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, first degree atrioventricular block, voltage left ventricular hypertrophy and right ventricular hypertrophy, incomplete right bundle branch block, and T-wave inversion in all four ventricles.
  • Functional Changes: increases in diastolic filling time; increase in stroke volume.
  • Peripheral Changes: increase in skeletal muscle fibres, increase in capillary conductance, increase in oxidative capacity, increase in mitochondrial enzymes, and increase in oxygen consumption.

Is This Condition Dangerous?

Although the structural changes associated with athlete’s heart resemble those present in other cardiac disorders, no adverse or debilitating effects are apparent. That said, athlete’s heart is a condition relegated mainly to athletes, so if you do not exercise regularly and experience symptoms of athlete’s heart, you could be dealing with a much more severe issue. That said, doctors are still studying athlete’s heart to determine once and for all if the condition is benign. No major treatments are required if you are diagnosed with athlete’s heart; however, your cardiologist should observe you for a deconditioning period of three months so that they can distinguish between athlete’s heart and a more severe condition like cardiomyopathy.

Athlete’s heart is not technically considered a medical condition, but it should be monitored closely to ensure that medical conditions with similar symptoms and signs aren’t present. If you experience chest pain or your heart measurements fall in a certain range between normal and abnormal, consult a cardiologist in Tampa from Ascent Cardiology  Group for a stress-free consultation to ensure that your heart health is in peak shape.

To consult a cardiologist in Tampa, FL, from Ascent Cardiology Group, please contact us today.

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